Monday, July 8, 2024

Cancer of the large intestine.. Affects the lower part of the digestive tract



Cancer of the large intestine:

Cancer of the large intestine, also known as colon cancer, is a type of cancer that begins in the large intestine (colon). The colon is the last part of the digestive tract, and it absorbs water from stool. Cancer of the large intestine can also begin in the rectum, the last few inches of the colon that connect to the anus.

Symptoms of colon cancer:

Early colon cancer often does not cause any symptoms. As the cancer grows, it may cause the following symptoms:
  • A change in bowel habits, such as diarrhea, constipation, or a change in the consistency of stool.
  • Blood in the stool.
  • Abdominal pain.
  • Cramps.
  • Bloating.
  • Fatigue.
  • Unexplained weight loss.

Causes of colon cancer:

Colon cancer is caused by changes in the DNA of cells in the colon. These changes can be inherited or caused by environmental factors. Some of the risk factors for colon cancer include:

- Age:

Colon cancer is most common in people over the age of 50.

- Personal history of polyps:

Polyps are noncancerous growths in the colon. People who have had polyps are at an increased risk of developing colon cancer.

- Family history of colon cancer:

People who have a first-degree relative (parent or sibling) with colon cancer are at an increased risk of developing the disease.

- Inflammatory bowel disease:

People with inflammatory bowel disease, such as Crohn's disease or ulcerative colitis, are at an increased risk of developing colon cancer.

- Lifestyle factors:

Diet, smoking, and obesity are all linked to an increased risk of colon cancer.

Prevention of colon cancer:

There are a number of things you can do to reduce your risk of developing colon cancer, including:

- Eating a healthy diet:

A healthy diet that is low in red meat and processed foods and high in fruits, vegetables, and whole grains can help reduce your risk of colon cancer.

- Maintaining a healthy weight:

Being overweight or obese increases your risk of colon cancer. Losing weight, if you are overweight or obese, can help reduce your risk.

- Exercising regularly:

Exercise can help reduce your risk of colon cancer. Aim for at least 30 minutes of moderate-intensity exercise most days of the week.

- Quitting smoking:

Smoking increases your risk of colon cancer. Quitting smoking can help reduce your risk.

- Limiting alcohol intake:

Excessive alcohol consumption increases your risk of colon cancer. Limiting your alcohol intake can help reduce your risk.

- Getting regular screenings:

Regular screenings, such as colonoscopies, can help detect colon cancer early, when it is most treatable.

Treatment of colon cancer:

The treatment for colon cancer depends on the stage of the cancer. Early-stage colon cancer may be treated with surgery. Surgery may also be used to remove advanced-stage colon cancer, but it may be combined with other treatments, such as chemotherapy or radiation therapy. Chemotherapy uses drugs to kill cancer cells, while radiation therapy uses high-energy beams to kill cancer cells.

Survival rates for colon cancer:

The survival rate for colon cancer depends on the stage of the cancer. The survival rate for early-stage colon cancer is very high, while the survival rate for advanced-stage colon cancer is lower.

If you are concerned about your risk of colon cancer, talk to your doctor. Your doctor can help you assess your risk and recommend appropriate screening tests.